Customer Login

Lost password?

View your shopping cart

Wrecking Ball Press

Contains Strong Language 2020

BBC Contains Strong Language

Wrecking Ball Press is delighted to partner with the BBC once again on BBC Contains Strong Language.

The partnership has seen three previous Contains Strong Language festivals delivered in Hull, from 2017-2019. For 2020, the UK’s largest festival of poetry and spoken word has relocated to Cumbria.

The festival takes place from September 25-27 at multiple locations that include Wordsworth Grasmere, Carlisle and Barrow-in-Furness. Live coverage of the festival will see events on BBC Arts BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4 with additional programmes on BBC iPlayer and BBC Sounds.

To find out more about Contains Strong Language 2020, view the brochure below and visit bbc.co.uk/containsstronglanguage, where you can also view highlights from previous festivals.

The Dean Wilson Film Club

Dean Wilson Film Club

Wrecking Ball Press is overjoyed at the news that the Dean Wilson Film Club is about to become a reality.

Dean is the self-titled fourth best poet in Hull and the second best poet in his beloved Withernsea. He collects pebbles off the beach and posts them on twitter, and writes poems that make your sides burst with laughter one minute and have you crying into your handkerchief the next. 

Wrecking Ball Press has published three collections by Dean: Take Me Up The Lighthouse (2020), WITH (2018) and Sometimes I’m So Happy I’m Not Safe On The Streets (2016) and he also appears in The Reater.

Earlier this year, Back to Ours hosted the online premiere of Dean and Dave Lee’s short film East Coast Fever. There was so much love for it that Back To Ours decided to ask the dynamic duo to film some more of Dean’s poems to create what the world has been waiting for – the Dean Wilson Film Club.

To access tune in to Back to Ours’ facebook and twitter streams at 9pm on the last Thursday of every month for a proper Dan treat and, in addition, get your dabbers ready for a game of bingo.

Ahead of the Dean Wilson Film Club launch, and between those monthly Thursdays, stock up your shelves with Dean’s three Wrecking Ball Press titles by visiting the links below.

Take Me Up The Lighthouse

WITH

Sometimes I’m So Happy I’m Not Safe On The Streets

Bad News

Publication day: Paul Birtill’s Bad News

Published by: Wrecking Ball Press

Publication Date: September 14, 2020

Purchase directly from the Wrecking Ball Press website at http://wreckingballpress.com/product/bad-news/

Paul Birtill

Paul Birtill’s new collection Bad News sees the poet return to his favourite themes of death, relationships and mental illness with his usual brand of dark humour, deep-veined irony and more than one poem about Coronavirus.

Paul Birtill was born in Walton, Liverpool in 1960 and lives in London. He has published a number of collections with Hearing Eye, including New and Selected Poems. He is also an accomplished playwright and several of his plays have been staged at London theatres, including Squalor, which was short-listed for the prestigious Verity Bargate award.

Packed with short, sharp, witty and irreverent observations.” –John Healy

Makes me laugh and feel depressed at the same time, and that’s a rare gift.” John Cooper Clarke

Time and again his dark humour hits the mark.” – Harry Eyres, Financial Times

His stark and hard-hitting verse skilfully echoes the neuroses of life.”Irish Post

We had a chat with Paul so he could tell us more about his new collection and squash the rumours about his use of correction fluid.

How would you describe Bad News?

The collection is a mixture of work, some of which is autobiographical, some of which is semi-autobiographical and a somewhat exaggerated version of events and some that display my usual black comedy.

Can you tell us something about where this collection came from, when you started work on the pieces within, why you wrote them, how they developed and how Bad News came to the attention of Wrecking Ball?

I started working on the poems in this collection just under three years ago. What tends to happen is that when I have enough poems together, maybe around 40, I’ll start to think about them in terms of a collection and come up with the title at that point. Coronavirus happened and I wanted to write something about it because we are living through history here and it’s important to capture that, even in my own funny way.

I’ve known the poet Dean Wilson for 20 years and I knew Roddy Lumsden, both published by Wrecking Ball. I sent some poems for inclusion in The Reater years ago but there were no more Reaters so that was that, even though the editor liked them. I read with Dean in Liverpool a couple of years ago and we swapped books. I really liked his book and the quality of its production and he told me to try Wrecking Ball again. So it’s all Dean’s fault.

Who are you writing for?

Normally I write poems in notebooks and if they’re any good I type them up on a typewriter. I start by reading them to half a dozen good friends and if they like them they’re in. If not, I don’t bother. So initially I write for my small circle of friends because they’re a good critical audience.

What experience do you want your readers to have with your work?

Somebody once said to Brendan Behan, “what’s the message in your work?” And he said, “there is no message, I’m not a fucking postman.” Sometimes I’m expressing ideas or my point of view which some people might find bleak and depressing but I also like to make people laugh.

Would you like to share something about your experience with independent publishers?

I had a great working relationship with John Rety, who founded Hearing Eye. He was the poetry editor of the Morning Star, an anarchist and a really good chess player. John published my first collection Terrifying Ordeal in 1996 and went on to publish other collections of mine and pamphlets and I liked him a lot. Good independents allow writers to remain independent too.

You avoid technology and continue to write on a typewriter. Why is that?

I do avoid technology, yes. I’ve never been on an aeroplane and if I travel to Europe I take a boat or Eurostar. I don’t drive a car and it was only in the last year that I got round to getting a mobile phone and only then because the landline was getting more expensive and there were some good deals to be had.

I’ve never really liked technology and I’m not the most practical or technically minded person, so I’ve never really wanted a computer. Someone told me once that they had a computer but quickly went back to a typewriter because they found it too easy to change things on screen and that’s what I feel too.

I have an electric typewriter, a Brother, that I’ve had for 30 years. I can’t even buy the ribbons in Rymans these days so have to order them and I hope I can continue to keep buying them when I need to but so few people use typewriters these days. I’m also a great user of Tippex. When I’m stocking up on Tippex at the newsagent’s I don’t think he quite believes that I use a typewriter at all. I’m pretty sure he thinks I sniff the Tippex.

How is the London life these days?

I moved down here from Liverpool on July 1, 1983. I’m quite good with dates. I’ve been here ever since aside from a year. I live down a leafy road near Hampstead Heath, so I’m in one of the nicest parts of London. Camden Town is down the road if I want to socialise, which I did a lot when I was younger.

I lived in Glasgow for a year, during the European Capital of Culture year. It was the dream place for a writer to be although I moved there for the drink and a woman I was unhealthily obsessed with. That was a great year-long party, the pubs never closed. I nearly stayed but then I ended up back in London after the year. If I ever do move from here now it would be to live back in Liverpool.

What does the future hold for you?

I’m coming up to 60th birthday next month. So with that and the publication of Bad News I’ll be enjoying myself. I’ve already got 20 more poems written and I’m still quite prolific as a poet, so more of that. I’ve also been a playwright since 1984, at the time of the miners’ strike, and have written ten plays and written poetry since 1987. The problem with plays is that you need a really strong idea to be able to sustain 90 minutes whereas with poetry, in ten lines you can write about something quirky and specific.

Purchase Bad News directly from the Wrecking Ball Press website at http://wreckingballpress.com/product/bad-news/

Wrecking Ball partners with The Rabbit Hole for Independent Bookshop Week

Independent Bookshop Week 2020

The Rabbit Hole, the independent bookshop based in Market Place, Brigg, has partnered with Wrecking Ball Press to celebrate Independent Bookshop Week 2020 (20-27 June).

The Rabbit Hole will be selling a range of Wrecking Ball titles in addition to other titles from indie publishers, national publishers, alongside events, book token offers and more to celebrate Indie Bookshops during the week. 

It will be one of hundreds of shops and events taking place at independent bookshops across the UK to mark Independent Bookshop Week.

The Rabbit Hole has just re opened after three months and is looking forward to the week to continue promoting Diversity in Books and reading.

Diverse Book Week started a run of events in June and working with schools and authors The Rabbit Hole will continue events throughout the summer. Authors like Richard O’ Neill, Onjali Rauf, Kathryn Evans Saviour Pirotta, Phil Earle, Katie Brosnan and up and coming local author/illustrator (Anna Terreros-Martin) Anna Doodles  all supported reading for pleasure events during “lockdown” reaching readers as far away as South Korea.

Nick Webb, from The Rabbit Hole, said: “The Rabbit Hole will be working with the wonderful and innovative Wrecking Ball Press based in Hull in an ongoing project to ‘Bridge the Gap’ across the Humber region. Working with publishers and independent groups and authors based in Hull, Grimsby, Scunthorpe and the many exciting and creative projects in the region.”

Signed copies of Dean Wilson’s collections will be available at The Rabbit Hole during Independent Bookshop Week 2020

Shane Rhodes, editor of Wrecking Ball Press, said: “We’re delighted to be partnering with The Rabbit Hole during Independent Bookshop Week. Books, reading, stories and poetry have never been more important than right now and independent bookshops are the lifeblood that give independent publishers like us the strength and power to get our books into the hands of readers.”

Wrecking Ball Press titles at The Rabbit Hole will include signed editions of books by Dean Wilson, Russ Litten, Vicky Foster, Peter Knaggs and Lee Harrison, alongside work by Toria Garbutt, Shirley May, celeste doaks, Isaiah Hull, Dan Fante and others.

Independent Bookshop Week launched in 2006 and is part of the Books Are My Bag campaign run by the Booksellers Association. IBW is a celebration of independent bookshops nationwide, and the role ‘indies’ play in their communities. Last year, the number of independent bookshops in BA membership grew to 890 shops, up from 883 in 2018.

Follow #indiebookshopweek / @booksaremybag to learn more about the campaign, or visit: indiebookshopweek.org.uk 

Follow The Rabbit Hole on twitter at @Therabbits21

Wrecking Ball Press Book Club

Poetry and prose from Wrecking Ball to you.

Imagine a Wrecking Ball Press title delivered to your door every single month. That’s what the Wrecking Ball Press Book Club is all about.

Here’s how it works – for just £80 we will send you a book on the same day every month for a year. The first book you will receive is your choice* – simply go through our back catalogue and pick the book you want.

After that we’ll select books for you from literary legends such as Ben Myers, Dan Fante, Roddy Lumsden, Geoff Hattersley, Niall Griffiths and exciting voices like Shirley May, Toria Garbutt, celeste doaks, Vicky Foster, Isaiah Hull, Barney Farmer, Dean Wilson, Andy Fletcher and Peter Knaggs.

So what are you waiting for? Join the Wrecking Ball Press Book Club, include all your contact details and, in the order notes, your choice of first book and we will add you to our lovely list of literature lovers who will be getting a year’s worth of words, one month at a time.

The £80 cost is fully inclusive of postage and packing, so the Wrecking Ball Press Book Club is great value for lovers of poetry and fiction.

So what are you waiting for? Head here to sign up:

http://wreckingballpress.com/product/wrecking-ball-press-book-club/

*excludes The City Speaks.

Wrecking Ball Press: Literature Lockdown

Wrecking Ball Press: Literature Lockdown

At Wrecking Ball Press we are, like other arts organisations, independent publishers and everyone across the UK, coming to terms with the impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on our work, day-to-day life, health and wellbeing. In the meantime, we’re giving away some free content to help you get through these difficult times and that we hope you will like.

Since 1997 Wrecking Ball Press has published high-quality, cutting-edge literature, building a national reputation that far exceeds its size. This is based on a commitment to connecting the most innovative and accessible novels and poetry with a readership not traditionally associated with literature. Wrecking Ball Press has a strong record of discovering exciting first time writers, many of whom have gone on to have further commercial and critical success with larger publishers.

We have a wealth of digital and analogue archives that we’re currently exploring and will be posting links to here for you to enjoy and engage with.

Our Books

Our books are available to buy directly from our online shop at http://wreckingballpress.com/shop/ 

In order to chew over your selection, you can browse our current catalogue on issuu here:

Wrecking Ball Press Catalogue 2020

If browsing catalogues isn’t your thing, you can watch the video below for a quick view of our available titles.

The Reater – Issue 4

In 2000 we published a special Millennium issue of The Reater. The Reater – Issue 4 contains a 40-track CD, featuring live readings by various poets. Contributors include Brendan Cleary, Ian Parks, Dean Wilson, Daithidh Maceochaidh, Labi Siffre and Fred Voss. We’ve posted a large selection of those recordings for you here. 

Dean Wilson

Dean Wilson has recorded a number of poems for us from his collection Sometimes I’m So Happy I’m Not Safe On the Streets, many of which he does not perform in public. Massive thanks to Dean for taking the time to record these poems.

Shane Rhodes – The City Speaks

The City Speaks, by poet Shane Rhodes, reflects on Hull’s history and its people and is engraved in Hull’s newly paved Queen Victoria Square. Local author Russ Litten says, “The words will now last another lifetime, but their sentiment will chime in the hearts and minds of our citizens for generations to come.” The poem was published in 2017 as a beautifully bound limited edition (3,000) book.

The City Speaks – Book Design

The limited edition book for The City Speaks was created by Human Design. Here, they talk about the process of creating a beautiful artefact, something that is both authentic and engaging, and a book which is of the city itself. http://humandesign.co.uk/portfolio/the-city-speaks-book-design/

The City Speaks – Hull 2017 launch film

Created for the opening ceremony of Hull 2017 UK City of Culture, this film by Dave Lee takes Shane Rhodes’ poem The City Speaks, which is about the history of Hull and its people, and attempts to reflect the words by showing the city and citizens as they are in the present day.

Vicky Foster: BBC Audio Drama Awards 2020 winner

Wrecking Ball Press writer Vicky Foster has won The Imison Award at the BBC Audio Drama Awards 2020.

Vicky won the award, which celebrates the best in new writing for the medium of audio drama, for her radio play Bathwater. Bathwater was produced by Susan Roberts and first aired on Radio 4 in 2019. The award is presented annually to an audio drama script by a writer new to the medium and which, in the opinion of the judges, is the best of those submitted.

Vicky Foster appearance on The Verb at BBC Contains Strong LanguageThe prize was established in 1994 in memory of Richard Imison, a BBC script editor and producer. Previous winners include Adam Usden, Mike Bartlett, Gabriel Gbadamosi, Murray Gold and Nell Leyshon.

The BBC Audio Drama Awards – presented by the BBC together with the Society of Authors and the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain – celebrate the range, originality and cut-through quality of audio drama on air and online and give recognition to creatives working in this genre.

Vicky was announced as The Imison Award winner at a ceremony in the Radio Theatre at BBC Broadcasting House London, hosted by Meera Syal, on Sunday 2 February 2020.

The list of finalists for the various categories of the awards included Stephen Dillane, Rebecca Front and Alexei Sayle.

Vicky was shortlisted for The Imison Award alongside Testament (for The Beatboxer) and Colette Victor (for By God’s Mercy). Bathwater is Vicky’s first full-length play, and is performed by herself and Finlay McGuigan with a sound score by The Broken Orchestra.

Vicky was one of the BBC’s selected poets for Contains Strong Language in 2017 and 2018. She continued her involvement with the festival, co-directed by Wrecking Ball Press, in 2019, with Fair Winds & Following Seas, jointly commissioned by CSL and Freedom Festival, and featuring on Radio 3’s The Verb with musical collaborators The Broken Orchestra.

You can find out more about award-winning Vicky at https://vickyfoster.co.uk/

Bathwater is published by Wrecking Ball Press and can be purchased at http://wreckingballpress.com/product/bathwater/

Press Release: New collection from poet Dean Wilson – Take Me Up The Lighthouse

Dean Wilson’s new collection Take Me Up The Lighthouse will be published by Wrecking Ball Press on January 31, 2020.

Take Me Up The Lighthouse follows previous Wrecking Ball publications of Wilson’s work Sometimes I’m So Happy I’m Not Safe on the Streets and the limited edition WITH. Wilson, whose humble brag is that he is the fourth best poet in Hull and the second best poet in Withernsea, is back with more of his trademark revelatory and brutally honest poems set against the backdrop of the Holderness towns and villages he frequents.

Take Me Up The LighthouseThis new collection takes the reader on emotional journeys via bus, covers encounters on benches and trains and entertaining postmen, while celibacy, sex and the search for romance are juxtaposed with orange curtains, omelettes and Cheerios.  Throughout, Wilson combines humour with heart-tugging pathos.

Having stepped out of the shadows during 2017 City of Culture year by making a host of live appearances and becoming a regular radio contributor, Wilson’s growing audience have been clamouring for more published work that builds on his existing output. 

Dean said: “I’m happy and anxious about the publication of Take Me Up The Lighthouse. I’m hoping that readers will enjoy the fun and the rhymes about my East Riding adventures.

“My life is all there in my work, warts and all. I don’t decide what to write about and what to leave out. I’m writing in my head all the time whether I’m walking on the beach, dusting, shopping, swimming or watching Corrie. Rhymes never leave me alone.”

Dean’s pain will bring readers pleasure. This new collection will also allow Dean to return to the stage with new work to perform, something he is surprisingly nervous about.

He said: “I love performing and making people laugh. It’s the best feeling I know. I don’t like the build up – the rehearsing and the doubts and the nerves, but it’s all worth it.”

Dean might be viewed as a Hull and East Riding treasure but his live performances beyond the region have proved beyond doubt that his work goes down well anywhere he reads and performs. His many local references and the concrete details that litter his poems about his east coast existence ground his work in a specific place but also allow his work to travel. His local take on life brings into sharp focus feelings and emotions of universal appeal. As he navigates his life, and what it means, readers realise they share common ground with the poet, even in his wildest, untamed and passionate moments.

As for Withernsea, where Dean is based, it seems the perfect place for this former postman to be located.

“I moved here a year ago. It’s a magical and wondrous place. There’s nowhere I’d rather be.”

Wrecking Ball Press editor Shane Rhodes said: “Dean’s a one-off, a totally unique man and it’s good to see his reputation continuing to grow. I originally published his work in The Reater, at the beginning of the Wrecking Ball story, and we’re proud to continue to publish his work.”

Dean will be announcing a series of gigs in 2020. Follow him on twitter at @PoetDeanwilson6 for updates.

For more information and to purchase Take Me Up The Lighthouse visit www.wreckingballpress.com

Author interview: Vicky Foster

Having risen to prominence following critically acclaimed appearances at two Contains Strong Language festivals, the broadcast of Bathwater on BBC Radio 4 and with a series of collaborative audio projects thrilling audiences, Vicky Foster reveals more about her work as a poet and author. 
 
BathwaterCan you tell us something about where Bathwater came from, why you wrote it, how it developed and how it ended up being published by Wrecking Ball Press?
Bathwater was a story that I’d been working up to for a long time I think. When those kind of things happen to you, you experience a lot of shame. I did anyway, and that shame and the nature of abuse means you lose your voice, in a big way. Singing and writing gave me mine back, and the further away from those experiences I got, the more I realised that it really wasn’t me who needed to feel ashamed, and I had a lot to say about it. I told Louise Wallwein I was thinking of writing a one-woman show and she offered to mentor me, and she spoke to Sue Roberts (BBC Radio Drama producer) who said she’d like to produce it for Contains Strong Language. Then Sue suggested we try and get it commissioned for Radio 4, and that happened while I was still writing it. Shane Rhodes (Wrecking Ball Press editor) was my writing mentor, and when he read it, he said he’d like to publish it. It just seems crazy even now, saying all that, but that’s the way it happened.
 
Who are you writing for?
I’m writing mostly for myself – it’s my way of making sense of things, I think. But also, I’ve realised through meeting and hearing people like Louise Wallwein, Toria Garbutt, Louise Fazackerley, Kate Fox, that it’s massively powerful to share experiences, especially if you’re working-class or a woman, or you’ve been through difficult things, because there are people out there going through those things right now, being told who they should be and what they’re allowed to do, and just knowing that it happened to someone else, you’re not on your own, and you can come out the other side is a huge thing.
 
What experience do you want your readers to have with your work?
Hmm… I was a bit shocked by how many people cried when they came to see Bathwater, and a bit worried by that. It’s not what I thought was going to happen, which seems a bit daft to say now, cos I suppose it is quite sad! But when I was writing it, I wasn’t really thinking about how people would react, I just wanted to make it as honest as possible. I suppose I just wanted them to feel something, and I suppose that worked.
 
When you’re embarking on a new piece of work, whether that’s a poem or a full length piece for performance, what approach do you take?
I think it’s different every time. A poem will often just fall out of the sky – they’ll sometimes come out nearly fully-formed and then just need a few edits. But Bathwater was a totally different process – I spent ages on structure with graphs and grids, and writing drafts and cutting them up. All that malarkey. Fair Winds and Following Seas (an audio experience commissioned by Freedom Festival) was different again – I talked a lot with (musicians and producers) The Broken Orchestra about what we wanted to say, then spent ages in all the locations on the walk, then worked all those details into the poems. It depends what you’re doing and why you’re doing it, I think.
 
Tell us something about your writing process? 
Ha. I’m always making plans for writing and then not sticking to ’em. It’s a weird mix between discipline and – I don’t know what you’d call it – intuition, subconscious – I don’t have a name for it – just letting your brain do what it needs to do in the background. I think you sort of get the hang of when to do each one. Sometimes you’ve got to be disciplined and sometimes you just need to lay on the sofa and watch Poirot while it all brews in your brain.
Vicky Foster appearance on The Verb at BBC Contains Strong Language
Photo: Andrew Smith
You’ve done a few collaborations with The Broken Orchestra now. How did that originally come about and what else have you got planned with them?
I first met The Broken Orchestra when I was recording some demos for a Carpenters tribute act when I was a singer, and they told me then how they were, at that time, working with different vocalists, and we talked about me maybe doing some vocals on a song with them. That never happened, but I sort of had a feeling we’d end up doing something together at some point. I’d never have guessed in a million years what it would be though. But I just knew straight away when I decided to write Bathwater that I wanted them to do the music, and luckily they said yes!
 
Do you have any thoughts about your experience of independent publishers?
I’ve been really lucky to have stuff published, and since I first saw how gorgeous Wrecking Ball’s books are I said I’d love to have something published by them one day. The fact that they’re small and based in Hull, and you can pop in and have a chat is really special as well, and that they’ve got an independent book shop in Princes Quay. I popped in there on my graduation day and had my picture taken with my book – you couldn’t do that sort of thing with a big publisher.
 
What’s it like working with the might of the BBC?
Just amazing. It’s like dream-come-true stuff. I still find it hard to believe it happened. I’ve got little tote bags from Contains Strong Language and sometimes I’ll be going shopping and pick one up, and think oh yeah, I’ve been on the radio, I’ve written for them. Everyone I met there and worked with has just been lovely and supportive.
 
We’ve heard you’re working on a novel?
I am! It’s going slowly at the moment. I’ve done all my planning – more grids and all that – and I know what it’s about. It’s been doing the brewing thing in the back of my brain while I’ve been busy on other stuff all year, but it feels like about time to start getting it out now. We’ll see…I’ve never done it before. It might not work. It’s a massive thing. Hats off to anyone who’s ever written a novel. It’s hard.
 
Hull 2017 UK City of Culture seemed to be a springboard for you to get your writing noticed – do you have any reflections on Hull’s year in the spotlight and what it meant for you as an artist?
I know I’ve been really lucky, and I know not everyone in the city had as great an experience in 2017 as I did, but for me, yeah, it was just a huge opportunity, and I was ready for it. I think it’s just that thing that sometimes happens where you’re in the right place at the right time and doing the right things. Which made a nice change for me, because a lot of my life I seem to have been in the wrong place doing the wrong things! Generally, I think it’s been an amazing thing for the city – in terms of realising what’s possible, and civic pride and all that. I know there are lots of discussions happening about legacy, and that’s important. But it’s one of those once-in-a-generation things that we’ll all be talking about for years. Our grandkids won’t believe us when we tell ’em about the streets being full of naked blue people, will they? Not until we show ’em the pictures anyway. As theatre company Middle Child say – it will never not have happened.
 
So what’s the future hold for you?
There’s a lot of maybes for next year, a lot of things that may or may not happen. I’ll just have to wait and see. I’ve had two or three years now of being a professional writer as my job, and it’s been amazing. If I have to go back to other stuff at some point, well, I’ll always have had these last few years, and I’ve loved every minute of it. And I’ll always write now, whether anyone’s gonna read it or not.
 
Vicky Foster’s Bathwater is published by Wrecking Ball Press and can be purchased online at www.wreckingballpress.com/product/bathwater. For more information about Vicky Foster and her work visit www.vickyfoster.co.uk. For more information about Vicky’s collaborators The Broken Orchestra visit www.thebrokenorchestra.com 

Poet interview: Dean Wilson

With a new collection from Dean Wilson imminent, Wrecking Ball Press caught up with Hull’s fourth best poet and the Withernsea-loving enigma to discuss the coastal town he loves, writing and pebble collecting.
 
Dean Wilson with the Turin Shroud of PebblesHow are you feeling ahead of a new collection?
Happy and anxious.
 
What experience do you want your readers to have?
A good laugh, mainly.
 
Your first collection Sometimes I’m So Happy I’m Not Safe on the Streets was followed by the publication WITH. Why With? What’s your fascination with the place?
I love With. I came to With every year on holiday when I was growing up. Lots of happy memories. I moved here a year ago. It’s a magical and wonderous place. There’s nowhere I’d rather be.
 
How does your life manifest itself in your writing?
It’s all there, warts ‘n’ all!
 
Your work’s pretty revealing then, so how do you decide what to write about and what to leave out?
I don’t decide what to write about and what to leave out. I’m writing in my head all the time whether I’m walking on the beach, dusting, shopping, swimming or watching Corrie.
Rhymes never leave me alone. I very rarely sit down and write unless I’m sending Wrecking Ball Press poems for my next book.
 
What impact has social media had on your poetry and writing?
I’m only on twitter. I joined in June 2016 just before Sometimes… came out. I love twitter. A lot of my poems I put straight on there. Short and fast and fun! I’ve met some ace people through twitter. I love it.
 
You make a really big impact with your live performances but get pretty anxious before a gig. How do you feel about performing your work?
I love performing and making people laugh. It’s the best feeling I know. I don’t like the build up – the rehearsing and the doubts and the nerves, but it’s all worth it.
 
Do you have any thoughts about your experience of independent publishers?
I’ve got nothing to compare it to. It’s the only way I know!
 
You’ve developed an obsession with pebbles. Tell us more about why?
It’s since I moved to With. I found one with a hole in and it blew my mind. Then a few weeks later I started Pebble of The Day on twitter and the rest is geology…
 
You’re working on a novel. How’s that going and what can we expect?
My first and last novel is about a young gay Brontë obsessed postman with a secret. It’s going very slowly. It’s hard work. Poems are easy, anyone can write poem. I won’t be writing another novel. Life’s too Doilies short!
 
So what’s the future hold for Dean Wilson?
Pebbles Pebbles Pebbles
Poems Poems Poems
Gigs Gigs Gigs
Books Books Books
Painting Painting Painting
Men Men Men
Doilies Doilies Doilies
Music Music Music.
 
Dean Wilson is a poet now based in the Holderness coastal town of Withernsea. He collects pebbles on the beach at With and posts them on twitter. Karen Turner recently made Dean a quilt inspired by his pebble collecting, which the poet described as “The Turin Shroud of the pebble world.” When Dean was a boy he never dreamt he’d be the 4th best poet in Hull and the 2nd best in Withernsea. Dean’s collections are published by Wrecking Ball Press. Whet your appetite for his next collection by purchasing Sometimes I’m So Happy I’m Not Safe on the Streets at www.wreckingballpress.com/product/sometimes-im-so-happy-im-not-safe-on-the-streets-dean-wilson.